Logic Gadgets: Sun & Sky

Icon logic gadgets sun and sky
Name of gadget Sun & Sky
Section Cameras & Lighting
Number of Tweak pages 2
Author LadylexUK, QuietlyWrong
Last updated 6 June 2019 [EA v1.03]

Description

With only rare exceptions, a Scene needs a light source and Dreams provides a standard illumination solution. Even when creating completely new scenes, you’ll get a default Sun and Sky.

Grabbing this gadget from your logic gadgets and stamping it in your scene doesn’t create a new “Sun” (or Sky), it merely allows you to customise the built-in one, like a global setting. For this reason, only one of these can be active at any one time – but that won’t stop you switching between them or animating changes to their settings. (OK, technically, you can have multiple gadgets active, in which case settings like the brightness and colour will be averaged, but you can only have one sun and one selection of sky image at a time.)

The Sun appears as a patch of brightness in the sky (if you want it to appear!) and you can change its location, brightness, colour and size. You can also choose whether it casts shadows. Although it’s called the Sun, you could make it a less intense, silvery shade in a dark sky to stand in for a full moon.

The Sky has a base colour you can tweak, as well as a number of styles and fleck types to choose from. You can also determine the overall fogginess of the Scene and make the horizon more or less distinct.

You can make a couple of changes to the Sun and Sky directly on the gadget that can’t be made directly through the tweak menu (at present). These are the rotational position of the Sun and of the Sky’s pattern, as well as the “distance” (brightness) of the sun. Grab, move and resize the bright “Sun” gizmo on the gadget itself to change its angle, brightness and size; grab and rotate the sky sphere (the sphere just above the gadget) to rotate the Sky image. To change these while a Scene is playing, you will need to use the Action Recorder or Keyframes.

Example Tutorial (adapted from Media Molecule)

The best way to see all the effects that you can achieve with the Sun & Sky gadget is to stamp one in a scene and fiddle with it!

  1. Stamp a Sun & Sky gadget into your scene (preferably one with plenty of sky in it!)
  2. The big ball on top of the gadget is the Sky. Grab it (R2 trigger) and spin it, and watch the scene’s sky image revolve.
  3. The small bright ball on a line above the Sky part is the Sun. Grab it (R2 trigger) and move it around the centre of the Sky. Note how shadows and lighting shifts accordingly, and the sun probably appears in the sky when the sun is pointing “away” from the gadget.
  4. Open the tweak menu and change the colour of the sun, maybe give it a blue colouration and see what effect that has.
  5. With the sun visible in the scene, try making it larger and smaller by dragging the Sun Size slider and see the range of sizes avaialble.
  6. Switch the “Sun Visible” tweak off and on again to see that it affects only the appearance in the sky, not the illumination.
  7. Click on the Sky Properties tab of the tweak screen.
  8. Change the Sky Image and see what effects that has.
  9. Change the Sky Fleck Type to see how that affects the sky’s appearance.

Feel free to look through all the settings available. When you’re trying to find the right mood for your scene, it pays to experiment!

 

Tweak Menus

Click on arrows to reveal

Tweak Menu 1: Sun Properties
sun_sky1
  1. Tweak Menu page 1: Sun Properties
  2. Colour
    2a. Input
    2b. Output
  3. Sun Brightness
    3a. Input
    3b. Output
  4. Sun Size
    4a. Input
    4b. Output
  5. Sun Visible
    5a. Input
    5b. Output
  6. Cast Shadows
    6a. Input
    6b. Output
  7. Power
  1. Menu page indicator
  2. Colour
    Whether you’re after the white hot midday sun of a scorching desert or the ruby rays of a relaxing tropical sunset, you can pick any colour for your sun right here. Pale blues may suggest the moon instead, or try a greenish or purple look for a surreal or alien landscape.
  3. Sun Brightness
    Here you can specify how bright the sun appears in the sky.
  4. Sun Size
    This tweak allows you to specify everything from a small point of light to a giant catastrophe-suggestive star.
  5. Sun Visible
    The sun doesn’t have to appear in the sky to illuminate the scene and cast shadows and sometimes you won’t want it cluttering up the sky. Tidy it away by deactivating this option.
  6. Cast Shadows
    By default, the sun casts shadows from elements in your scene, but perhaps you don’t want that – maybe you’re underground or it’s just a cloudy day. Deactivate this option to deactivate shadows. And if you’re trying to optimise performance, note that fewer shadows means better frame rates in Dreams.
  7. Power
    This is where you turn the gadget on/off.
Tweak Menu 2: Sky Properties
sun_sky2
  1. Tweak Menu page 2: Sky Properties
  2. Sky Image
    2a. Input
    2b. Output
  3. Sky Fleck Type
    3a. Input
    3b. Output
  4. Sky Brightness
    4a. Input
    4b. Output
  5. Sky Saturation
    5a. Input
    5b. Output
  6. Sky Hue Cycle
    6a. Input
    6b. Output
  7. Sky Tint Colour
    7a. Input
    7b. Output
  8. Sky Tint Intensity
    8a. Input
    8b. Output
  9. Horizon Definition
    9a. Input
    9b. Output
  10. Fog Range
    10a. Input
    10b. Output
  11. Power
  1. Menu page indicator
  2. Sky Image
    This slider can be used to select one of a number of built-in patterns for the sky. You can still impose a “tint” colour for the pattern, and use saturation and hue to further subtly alter its appearance. Not to mention rotating the whole sky using the widget directly. Combined with Fleck Type, the sky can adopt a whole range of appearances.
  3. Sky Fleck Type
    The sky is drawn from flecks – like almost everything in Dreams – and by specifying the fleck type here you can dramatically alter the “texture” of the sky.
  4. Sky Brightness
    Specify how bright (or dim) you want the sky to be, and the amount of corresponding illumination on the elements of your Sccene. Pull it all the way down for a night scene or ramp it up for high noon in dry, blistering heat.
  5. Sky Saturation
    Not raindrops but colour! Use this slider to determine how much colour the sky has – if this is a low value, your skies will be very grey, regardless of colour.
  6. Sky Hue Cycle
    Use this slider to change the sky’s hue; it works better with stronger colours. You can cycle through reddish to blueish tones. This affects all the colours in the sky image equally so if your sky ranges from red to yellow, say, a variation in hue to make the red look more yellow will also make the yellow look greener as a knock-on effect.
  7. Sky Tint Colour
    When you need to get the sky to the perfect colour, the selection of Sky Images and the Hue Cycle probably won’t be enough on its own. Use the Sky Tint Colour to add a tinge of any colour you choose to the atmosphere, and use the Intensity slider below to determine how subtle the effect is.
  8. Sky Tint Intensity
    Having selected a Sky Tint Colour to add to the sky, increase this value to increase the amount of effect that has.
  9. Horizon Definition
    Use this to choose between a hazier or sharper horizon definition.
  10. Fog Range
    There is a default degree of “mistiness” in your scene, beyond which elements become increasingly obscured. Use this tweak to determine what that distance is. A lower distance can help improve performance when you’re optimising your level, or just lend an eerie effect to background elements. Note that there is also a Fog gadget that can be used for localised fog patches.
  11. Power
    This is where you turn the gadget on/off.

Lex Tips

Useful Tutorials

 

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